The Huffington Post about Swoon simulating „What It’s Like To Have A Shared-Death Experience“

Swoon’s project, “Swimming Cities of Switchback Sea,” features seven boats including this steam-powered paddleboat.

Three loud blasts from a steam whistle screamed out as the rain drizzled on the riverbank here. And the fleet of seven eclectic handmade ships slowly moved away.

Only minutes before their launching, on Friday around noon, a group of people, mostly in their 20s and 30s, was still preparing for the voyage down the Hudson River. In between bites of jelly doughnuts, the crew, dressed in hipster hillbilly chic, hustled to clean up pieces of scrap metal and ready the boats. In the middle stood the artist known as Swoon in a bright yellow rain poncho and jeans.

Brooklyn Street Art Blog visits Swoon in her NYC Studio

Brooklyn Street Art Blog visits Swoon in her Studio.

A visit to Swoon’s studio is a full immersion into her passions; meditations on humanity, the process of collaboration, and sculptures you can inhabit. In the rustic warm light of a triple height cavernous space that might have served as a town hall a score of printed artworks on paper lay scattered across the wooden floor. Tiptoeing between the images to cross the formerly grand chamber, the familiar faces of children and adults who you’ve met on walls across the city look up at you. Together these figures, a de facto retrospective of Swoons’ last few years on the street in NYC, are burned into the retina of many a Street Art fan, and yet they lay here on this whitewashed wood-slatted floor without any ceremony at all.

New York Times Article about Swoons Floating City project

Swoon’s project, “Swimming Cities of Switchback Sea,” features seven boats including this steam-powered paddleboat.

Three loud blasts from a steam whistle screamed out as the rain drizzled on the riverbank here. And the fleet of seven eclectic handmade ships slowly moved away.

Only minutes before their launching, on Friday around noon, a group of people, mostly in their 20s and 30s, was still preparing for the voyage down the Hudson River. In between bites of jelly doughnuts, the crew, dressed in hipster hillbilly chic, hustled to clean up pieces of scrap metal and ready the boats. In the middle stood the artist known as Swoon in a bright yellow rain poncho and jeans.